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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
place by the end of the week. assassination in afghanistan. president karzai's brother a key political power broker gunned down by his own bodyguard. what does it mean for nato forces in the south? a new focus on the back mab campaign. this time it's about her husband. his clinic under the microscope for using a controversial therapy to turn gay men straight. >>> and good day, ern. i'm savannah guthrie in for andrea mitchell today. it is back to the bargaining table for congressional leaders this afternoon three weeks from today to the debt ceiling deadline. both sides say they want a deal, but there's been in compromise or breakthrough yet. we go to kristen welker at the white house. we know officials are meeting this afternoon. the president making some news about what might happen if the debt ceiling is not raised in early august. >> that's right. president obama in an interview earlier today was asked whether the united states would have enough money to continue paying its social security checks on august 3rd if a deal isn't reached over the debt ceiling on august 2nd, wh
and ultimately afghanistan. this is the first attack in three years. we saw what happened last time. there was restraint by the indians. but indian diplomats tell me with the next attack they may not be restrained if they find out that it did emanate from pakistan. >> that's right. they have been cautious to point blame until they have more facts. the fact that it was simultaneous attacks. this dazy chain operation of the facts three at a time, and the fact that this was done in mumbai the financial capital of india. that really has the attacks from three years ago in november of 2008. >> these other pakistani groups. pakistani groups that have been linked to pakistan's government. they're not just separate terror groups. they are groups that are closely connected with elements inside pack tan ji intelligence. we should point out we don't know. early reports can be deceiving. there's always a lot of suspicion because there is paranoia in islamabad and mumbai and new dele. american officials have long complained that pakistan doesn't focus enough on its terror groups and focuses too
afghanistan, the paper reports the possible halt of $800 million in assistance and equipment. that could have an effect on u.s. troops in afghanistan. the report says the aid could resume if pakistan takes tougher action against the taliban as well as al qaeda. meanwhile, secretary panetta told reporters on the plane it's time to focus on defeating al qaeda once and for all. >> i think we had undermined their ablthd to conduct 9/11-type attacks. we had them on the run. >> secretary panetta met with american military officials. atia abawi is in afghanistan. good morning. bring us up to date. >> good morning. panetta's very first trip as secretary of defense to afghanistan, before he landed he brought up the situation with al qaeda. he said, quote, the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach. this is a time to go after him, especially after bin laden. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden, to put maximum pressure on them because i do believe that, if we continue this effort, that we can really cripple al qaeda. >> panetta said that,
of defeat. we are in kabul, afghanistan, good morning to you, atia. is secretary pa at the time in panetta sounding very upbeat here? >> reporter: it sound that way. he did speak to reporters saying al qaeda was -- the strategic defeat of al qaeda was within reach. he talked about finding the treasure-trove of information in the compound. that bin laden was hiding out there. including 10 to 20 names of key leaders of al qaeda, whether they be in yemen, somalia, pakistan or north and central africa. but on this trip in afghanistan panetta is expected to meet with his counterpart, the defense ministry in afghanistan, and he is also expected to have a press conference with the afghan president, hamid karzai. aside from that, the most important part of the visit is talking to the u.s. commanders on the ground here in afghanistan, talking to the u.s. servicemen and women as well who are fighting the fight within the country. right now the strategic time within the war and afghanistan, the president announced the withdrawal plan by the end of this year. 10,000 americans are supposed to leave the
, is in afghanistan. pinetta flew into the capital, kabul, and he told reporters on the plane there that al qaeda is on the verge of defeat. the u.s. captured important information about the terrorist group from osama bin laden's compound in may. now is the moment to go after cloudy. we'll have a live report from afghanistan coming up in our next half hour for you. >>> casey anthony making a surprising move just eight days before her release from a florida jail. the 25-year-old was acquitted of murder charges earlier this week. she was convicted of lying to police in the death of her 2-year-old daughter, caylee, back in 2008. let's go live to orlando, nbc's lila luciana. what happened in jail? >> good morning, alex. well, we've heard reports that casey anthony has declined a request for a visit by her mother, cindy anthony. she has not spoken to her family since 2008 while caylee was still missing following her attorney's consents, and she said she did not want to see her mother. cindy anthony had also requested so see her before the trial, but she declined. we don't know where she'll go once she
everything necessary to protect you. >> before heading to baghdad, panetta visited afghanistan where he met with the country's leaders and u.s. troops and commanders. >>> a horrible tragedy to talk about has led to the controversy in madison, wisconsin, as police investigate the deaths of two young children. investigators say that the bodies of two kids were found inside of the car, and now we are hearing that an amber alert was never issued for the two missing kids even though the mother says she did. michelle sigona is live in washington, d.c. with the latest on this. michelle, walk us through the story here if we are hearing what happened correctly that the parent did report the kids missing, why wasn't the amber alert issued? >> well, that is correct. i had an e-mail conversation with the madison, wisconsin, police department, and they said they did consider initially issuing the amber alert, but unfortunately, they had to take a lot of fac tors into consideration. they didn't believe at first it was an abduction because the boyfriend had helped to pick up the children from the father a
. but it's got to happen sooner than later. >> and mik, in afghanistan, what was the meeting -- what did you learn about the meeting between secretary panetta and president karzai? >> reporter: i think what came out of that was the fact that it was cordial. you know, the meetings that president karzai has had with other u.s. officials recently hasn't really been all that friendly. you know, president karzai has given long-winded speeches about civilian casualties and the like, with the u.s., including the former defense secretary, robert gates, sitting right next to him. but what came out of that meeting was a sense of cardialty that had been missing to some extent in that u.s./afghan relationship. panetta says he believes that things are on course for a successful conclusion to the u.s. military operations there in afghanistan, still set to end at the end of 2014. and by the way, you know, the u.s. has also decided to withhold $800 million in military aid to pakistan right next door, because there's been some tension, obviously, since the killing of bin laden. but what happened is that
at a critical moment with afghanistan broke from her official duties to do a lengthy briefing of murdoch's editors from around the world. no doubt we've seen these sorts of relationships in the u.s. >> does this beg the question, though, something like what happened to "news of the world" could happen here inside the u.s.? if these tactics are being used and administered in that corporation, how come they wouldn't be used in the united states if they are so successful else where? >> well, i think we have to understand that different parts of the world have different approaches to journalism, and there's simply no doubt that the united states has different practices. for instance, we have a constitutional amendment that protects the right to privacy. it's quite engrained in our life, so i'm not sure you'll see an exact parallel, but opening up the discussion about how murdoch operates and the way murdoch's operations have grown via relationships with government is a significant thing to do. remember, rupert murdoch has aggressively lobbied the federal communications commission for a lifti
of honor recipient. >> willie, so many guys that have been in that situation, iraq and afghanistan and you are involved in helping some of them. we met some of them a couple weeks back. >> yes, a group called operation men. guys severely burned in ied explosions. the thing that strikes you with them and staff sergeant petry, they want to go back. >> they all want to go back. >> they want to get back and be with their brothers. sergeant petry eight deployments. he went back after losing his hand. he went back to fight. >> we have been talking, not just this morning but days on end about what's going on in washington with the debt ceiling. sergeant petry just said something about the men and women he served with having their bodies stole from them. it's an exact quote. they have something else stolen from them. it's full recovery. it's assistance for traumatic brain injuries down the road for decades to come. we have to pay for these things. >> we do. >> they better bear down in washington, 10% as much as sergeant petry, bear down. >> it's going to be a long, long haul for the young men and
found out that his son, james, who died in afghanistan in 2006 may have had not only his cell phone tapped into by the "news of the world" but also his e-mail. >> they hacked into a dead soldier. it's despicable. what else can you say? what on earth did they think they were going to find? >> reporter: in words of the prime minister, people trust the police to protect them. politicians to represent them. and press to inform them. and, he says, the british public has been failed by all three. >> we're now hearing that ru period of time murdock will fly into the u.k. tomorrow as this scandal threatens to spread. to spread to the united states where one of his most senior executives now runs dow jones in new york, but used to run the operation here, and possibly to spread to other newspapers. it is no exaggeration to say that this scandal threatens british tabloid journalism as we know it. >> okay. kier simmons, lots on the line here. thank you very much, from london. >>> independence day for the youngest nation in the world. tens of thousands of people turned out to celebrate south sud
petrie. he lost his hand while throwing away an enemy grenade in afghanistan, saving two other rangers. >>> mississippi's attorney general is suing the administrator of the spoil fund, accusing him of denying claims. >>> cindy anthony will not face >>> cindy anthony will not face perjury charges. >>> welcome back to "hardball." with the "news of the world," the scandal went to the top today. rupert murdoch, his son james and top editor rebekah brooks all summoned to appear next week before a british parliamentary committee. last night former prime minister gordon brown announced "news of the world" hacked his records. he also described his reaction to the 2006 "sun" newspaper report that revealed his son had had cystic fibrosis. >> in tears. your son is now going to be broadcast across the media sarah and i were incredibly upset about it. we were thinking about his long-term future. we're thinking about our family. >>> joining us now is cnbc's simon hobbs and "vanity fair" contributor michael wolfe, who wrote the cover story. simon, give us an update. what have been the evil infraction
, a tremendous concern, he says. meantime in afghanistan over the weekend, the defense secretary claiming u.s. forces are with reach of breaking al qaeda. we're almost there. granted, there's only about two dozen of them, but we're almost ready to break them. and as we learned al qaeda, of course, not real threat. a new book raises questions about the methods we use to fight the war on terror in general. the author "glen carl, a former spy at the cia. the book called "the interrogator" an education. portions of the book redactsed by the central intelligence agency and mr. carl, it's a pleasure to meet you electronically. why did you write this book and what are you loping to achieve? >> thank you very much. i wrote it for two reasons. patriotic and personal ones. i was proud to serve my country for my career for 23 years. i think we're all proud of our country and we want our country to live up to the ideals that we believe it embodies and i took an oath to serve. i also am one of only ones firsthand experience in the interrogation policies used since 9/11 and wrote it for personal reasons,
phillipson just found out his son james who died in afghanistan in 2006 may have had his cell phone tapped into by the news of the world and also his e-mail. >> they hacked into a dead soldier. it is despicable. what else can you say? what on earth do they think they were going to find? >> reporter: in word of the prime minister, people trust the police to wrote tect them, politicians to represent them and the press to inform them. and, he says, the british public has been failed by all three. alex, just to explain why some people are so upset by this is alleged, for example, a missing 13-year-old girl had her mobile phone hacked into, voice mails left by her parents listened to by a private detective and even some voice mails deleted to make space so more voice mails could be left. that's why this scandal is threatening to change the nature of the tabloid press in this country. >> well, that action is obscene. it looks like they will pay for that one. thank you, keir simmons. >>> from a runaway boat to a runaway horse, here are stories you missed from the week. a scene from "the mummy." o
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)